Online Games and Activities for Grades 2-3

Counting and Ordering

Whack a Mole. Players set the start number (0-100) and the number they will count by (1-20). The starting number will be displayed at the top of the screen. The player clicks on the number that comes next when they see a mole labeled with that number pop out of a hole. Second and third graders can practice counting by 1 from any number (e.g. 12, 37), and skip counting by numbers to 10 (e.g. count by 3's, 6's, or 10's).

Higher and Lower. Players put 5 cards in order. The cards have objects, words, or numbers on them. Choose numbers to 20, 100, or 1000, or the versions that provide practice with ideas about time.

Spooky Sequences. A line of numbered ghosts appears, one without a number label. Players type the number that should be on that ghost. Second graders will benefit from playing with numbers to 30, 100, or 1000; from the versions that focus on counting by 2’s, 5’s, and 10’s; and the versions that focuses on counting back by 1’s, 2’s, and 10’s. (From Oswego City School District.)

Addition and Subtraction

Connect Sums. Players click on dot cubes (or numerals, or coins) that touch to make the target amount, which changes after each correct answer. There is a “solve mode” and a “race mode”. (This game requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Sums Stacker. Players rearrange three stacks of dot cubes (or numerals, or coins) to make 3 target sums. There are rules about moving the dot cubes that require strategic thinking. There is a “solve mode” and a “race mode”. (This game requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Ghost Blaster. Videogame-like practice with 2-addend combinations of any number up to 99. The players choose a target number and then try to be the first to click when they see two ghosts (labeled with numbers) that equal the target number. (From Oswego City School District.)

Ann & Addem’s Dartboard Game. The inner circle of the dartboard is labeled with the numbers 2-9 and are worth their “face value”. The outer circle is worth double the inner circle. Players place one (level 1), two (level 2) or three (level 3) darts to make a target number. The size of the target numbers increases with each level, and addition notation is part of levels 2 and 3. From the BBC. (This game requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Techno Tortoise. Players direct a turtle on a number line to solve a given addition problem making only jumps of +10, +5, and +/- 1.

Number Jump. Players use jumps of +/- 1-9 to use a ball to squish flies on 4 numbers parallel lines (with 1-hole gaps in them, for traveling from one to the next). (This game requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Powerlines. Students are presented with a gameboard and several sequential numbers. They are asked to place the numbers in positions such that each line is equal to the total that is displayed on the bottom of the page.

Circle 21. In order to complete the puzzle, each circle must add up to 21, using all of the numbers. When a circle is completed correctly, it changes color.

Speed Grid Challenge: Addition. Players click on two numbers that make the equation below the grid true. (e.g. __ + __ = 12). Players decide how many problems they want to solve in how many minutes. Level 1 includes numbers to 20 on the board, Level 2 goes to 40, and Level 3 goes to 50. (From Oswego City School District.)

Speed Grid Challenge: Subtraction. Players click on two numbers that make the equation below the grid true. (e.g. __ - __ = 27). Players decide how many problems they want to solve in how many minutes. Level 1 includes numbers to 20 on the board; Level 2 goes to 40. (From Oswego City School District.)

Subtraction Action. Players choose a string of single digit numbers from a large board of the numbers 0-9, that when subtracted from the given amount, equal the given total. (50 - ? – 17)

Addition and Subtraction Facts

Count Hoot’s Number Games. Players solve a variety of addition and/or subtraction problems, including unknown change problems (4 + ? = 6 and 6 - ? = 2). Choose Level 3 for problems involving facts to 20. From the BBC. (This game requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Save the Whale. Given two labeled pipes of 10, side by side, the player has to complete the partially filled in one (e.g. if it has 6 links, the player needs to drag the one with 4 links up) to save the whale.

Math Lines: Add to 10. The player needs to shoot a ball labeled with a number 1-10. If it hits the number that sums with it to make 10, both balls disappear (i.e. try to shoot the 7 so that it hits a 3).

Add It Up. Players start with a board full of the numbers 1-9. The target number changes each time the player succeeds in making the previous one – using any number of squares (and they don’t have to be adjacent).

Alien Addition. Players are given a total and must shoot a space ship whose expression equals that total. Players can set the range of the content and the speed at which they'd like to play: slow, normal, or fast. At the end of the game, statistics are provided, including information about errors.

Addition Eaters. The player directs a monster around a board, making it eat only the expressions that equal the target number which is first 3, then 4, etc.

Sum Sense. Given 3 or 4 cards (e.g. 6 9 5 1) and an empty expression (_ + _ = _), make a mathematically correct equation (e.g. 9+6=15). Players can set the number of questions and the amount of time. (From Oswego City School District.)

Jet Ski. Video-game-like practice of the addition combinations. A problem is posed, and the player has to click on the correct answer (of 3 choices) to get the jetski to drive faster and win the race. After, the game provides statistics including information about errors.

Addition and Subtraction Game. Players begin with a board full of the numbers 0-9. They try to clear as much of the board as possible in the time allotted by correctly choosing numbers that make the equations that appear beneath the board (e.g. __ - __ = 4 or __ + __ = 9) true.

Subtraction Eaters. The player directs a monster around a board, making it eat only the expressions that equal the target number which is first 3, then 4, etc.

Sum Sense: Subtraction. Given 3 or 4 cards (e.g. 5 1 6) and an empty expression (_ - _ = _) make a mathematically correct equation (e.g. 6-5=1). Players can set the number of questions and the amount of time. (From Oswego City School District.)

Island Chase. Video-game-like practice of the subtraction facts. A problem is posed, and the player has to click on the correct answer (of 3 choices) to get the jetski to drive faster and win the race. After, the game provides statistics including information about errors.

Minus Mission. Players are given a difference and must shoot a green blob whose expression equals that number. Players can set the range of the content and the speed at which they'd like to play: slow, normal, or fast. At the end of the game, statistics are provided, including information about errors.

Place Value

Give the Dog a Bone. A dog asks you to find a particular number on a blank 100 chart. Clicking a square causes its number to appear. (From Oswego City School District.)

Shark Numbers. Given three possible numbers, click on the one that shows how many base 10 blocks there are. If wrong, a shark takes a bite of the boat.

Place Value Eaters. The player directs a monster around a board, making it eat only the numbers with the specified number of tens or ones.

Lifeguards. Players try to save swimmers located on a number line using only jumps of 10 or 1. (A move of ten 1’s is not allowed.)

Money

Coin Combo Game. Players click on combinations of coins that make the target amount, which changes after each right answer. Level 1 involves pennies and nickels; Level 2 adds dimes; Level 3 adds quarters. As the levels increase, the target amount does as well.

Sums Stacker: Coins. On the home page, click on the coin. Then, rearrange the coins to make the 3 totals. Players need to work strategically since coins can’t necessarily be moved singly if they are not at the top of a column.(This game requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Connect Sums: Coins. On the home page, click on the coin. Then, click on combinations of coins – they must be neighbors – that make the target amount, which changes after each right answer. The goal: clear the board. (This game requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Cash Out. Students count out change for customers, depending on what they purchase. Students choose the level (easy, medium, hard), whether they want hints displayed, and whether they need to figure out how much change to provide (vs. providing a given amount of change).

Multiplication and Multiplication Facts

Carl's Cookie Capers. A tutorial and a game that provides a model of multiplication -- some number of cookies, with some number of chips on each cookie -- as well as addition and mutliplication notation for situations about equal groups. For example one problem might show an image of 5 cookies each with 3 chips and then represent that problem both as 3+3+3+3+3=15 and as 5 x 3=15.

Camel Times Tables. Help Molly load her camel with the right amount of food for her trip by clicking on the multiplication expression that matches the situation illustrated. Note that this is a British game, so the illustrations show 5 taken 7 times for 5 x 7 (e.g. 7 plates each with 5 strawberries), rather than 5 groups with 7 strawberries in a group. Also, the "really hard" level uses the word sum to refer to the expression. From the BBC. (This game requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Math Cats. Students can explore multiplication through the use of arrays on this site.  Students select the dimensions of the array and then it is displayed in the grid.  More of a tool than a game, but helpful for learning multiplication with arrays.

Wade’s Workout. Help Wade get in shape by punching the correct answer to a given multiplication question. (Or by choosing food for him to eat, weights for him to lift, or umbrellas along his run.) Students can work on specific facts or three sets of mixed problems. During each round, the game keeps track of the number of right/wrong answers.

Knights of Math. Players select a level (that correlates to the sets of facts it tests) and then choose the correct answers to given multiplication problems. With each correct answer, a piece of the kingdom is placed on the screen. After 60 correct answers, students can design their own kingdom.

All Four Operations

Fishy Numbers. Play against the computer or another person. Take turns using two numbers and any of the 4 operations to highlight a fish on the board. The player with the most fish wins. (Copyright 2006 by counton.org.)

Time

Clock Works. Click on the digital time that matches the time displayed on the clock; or, click on the time it will be in a given amount of time. In the "really hard" level, you click on the time in words (rather than in digital format), and work with times to the quarter hour. From the BBC. (This game requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Stop the Clock. Match 5 analog clocks telling times to the hour with the words that match that clock. Other variations focus on matching analog clocks that show times to the half hour, quarter hour, five minutes or minute, to digital clocks showing the same times. (From Oswego City School District.)

Geometry and Measurement

Concentration. The player tries to find matches between shapes and shape names. The cards can be face-up or face-down. The computer will read the words aloud if requested.

Tangram Puzzles. Students arrange a set of 2-D shapes to form a picture. Some students will do better with sites that provide the outlines of the puzzle they are to solve, rather than just a small picture of the completed puzzle, and may need help learning how to turn shapes to change their orientation. Tangram Puzzles (from PBS's Cyberchase Games) has 20 puzzles to choose from and Tangrams has 14 (choose one of the pictures at the bottom of the window). (The PBS site requires Adobe's Shockwave download.)

Symmetry. This site offers explains and offers explorations of reflective and rotational symmetry. Students can also make their own symmetrical designs.

Data

Guess My Button. Students try to figure out which button the computer has chosen by asking yes/no questions. Some students will need help with the reading, with determining the different attributes, and with the logistics of playing (e.g. how to ask a question, how to process the feedback from the computer).

Pattern Quest. Much like the familiar game Master Mind, students get 8 tries to guess the four cars (and their order) that the computer has secretly chosen. After each attempt, the computer gives feedback. (At the easy level, the game tells which car(s) are correctly placed; in the hard level, the game gives feedback only about the cars used, not their placement.) After the 8th and final try, the answer is revealed to them if they did not figure it out. (From PBS's Cyberchase Games.)

Patterns and Functions

Color Patterns. Students finish a partially completed pattern.

Function Machine. Students have to guess the rule the machine is using to change numbers as they pass through it. The machine collects data about the numbers that have gone into and out of the machine. They guess the rule by entering the operation and the number (e.g. x 10 would mean the machine multiples every number that goes through it by 10). (From PBS's Cyberchase Games.)